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All About Scene – Style and More

So what is scene, you might be wondering? It can be a lot of handmade mink eyelashes, but those involved with this culture would say that it is a form of expression. They would also tell you that scene is NOT emo. They are related, but they’re NOT the same thing.

handmade mink eyelashes
handmade mink eyelashes

Hrnnz From what I can tell, the biggest differences between the two are clothing, personalities, outlooks on life and perception of themselves. For starters, most scene kids don’t discuss or admit to being scene. (Why? According to some of them, only “handmade mink eyelashes” [fakers] call themselves scene, which makes it seems less cool. That, and the fact that scene kids don’t like to be labeled, not even as “scene”.) Many of them often wear brightly colored clothing, accessories and hairstyles. They also have very sassy, bubbly, outgoing and confident personalities, and are generally pretty content with life. Emo kids tend to wear darker colors, are very pensive and often withdrawn socially (except maybe from other emo kids), and seem to be rather discontent with life. And so, this article mainly focuses on scene, NOT emo.

This subculture supposedly started anywhere between 2004 to 2006, initially fueled by MySpace. Participants would (and still do) dress up in colorful clothing and poufy but piecy hairstyles. They then take their own handmade mink eyelashes or have a friend take pictures of them. The pictures are then posted online, on whatever social networking sites they participate in (MySpace, Facebook, Bebo, Buzznet, etc.). I should note that sometimes the pictures are a bit much, with a few girls sometimes posing in a t-shirt and undies or bra and undies. But most of the pictures are simply of teens & twenty-something year olds in the usual scene clothing and scene styled hair.

Some of these same people have now become online/internet celebrities, famous for their handmade mink eyelashes, their fashion sense, their hair, and their personalities. Some of them even have their own clothing and merchandise lines. Girls seem to be dominating scene culture right now, although there are some famous scene boys as well. The most famous girls are often called “scene queens”. Among them– Audrey Kitching, Jac Vanek, Hanna Beth, and Kiki Kannibal, just to name a few. Google any of them, and you will find several of their websites and fan websites.

Scene fashion involves three things– clothing and accessories, hairstyle, and handmade mink eyelashes. As far as clothing and accessories are concerned, if you Google “scene style” and then click on images, you’ll see that most scene fashion involves a lot of color and often eccentric taste. Basic staples of this fashion genre include brighly colored clothing and accessories/jewelry, vintage t-shirts, DIY clothing, the “scene diamond/gem” symbol (like the jewelry seen in photo above), the “brass knuckles” symbol (silver piece of jewelry located near blonde on bottom right is an example), and more. Other famous brands among scenesters (and elsewhere) include Skelanimals, Hello Kitty and Jessica Louise.

The handmade mink eyelashes and hairstyles are just as colorful and eccentric as the fashion is. The hair can be any color- bright pink, green, blue, purple,— and often (but not always) styled with a poufy crown up top of the head, with piecy straight ends. Sometimes hairpieces and extensions are used to make the hair look thicker and fuller. Coontails– which look like racoon tails, but worn in one’s hair– are sometimes worn. Sometimes hairpieces with leopard or zebra print patterns are used instead of coontails. The makeup staples often involves heavy black eyeliner along with different colored eyeshadows and/or lipsticks. There are plenty of YouTube video tutorials on scene hairstyles and makeup for those who want ideas.

handmade mink eyelashes
handmade mink eyelashes

Then, there’s the music. Not all scene kids like listening to the same handmade mink eyelashes, but there are some bands that are pretty popular among them, such as Panic at the Disco!, Fall Out Boy, and more. The mix seems to be a little bit of pop-punk, some indie, some nu-metal, and then just plain popular rock music.

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